Five Misconceptions of CrossFit

You have probably seen, or heard, about a type of training called “CrossFit”.   You have probably also heard a lot of rumors about CrossFit and how you should, or shouldn’t take part.  Here are five misconnections about CrossFit, from Miranda, a certified CrossFit coach.

CrossFit is not for everyone. This is one of the biggest misconceptions about CrossFit!  CrossFit was designed to maintain the ability to perform functional tasks such as getting up from a chair, toilet or floor as we age.  Greg Glassman, the founder of CrossFit, designed the program to improve one’s fitness and health. CrossFit is cardiovascular intense while also using Olympic lifting for strengthening to improve one’s flexibility and functional strength by using many muscle groups during each lift. CrossFit now offers kids classes that range from 5-12 in age as well as master classes where 55 to 90-year old’s are performing CrossFit. CrossFit is very versatile, and movements can be scaled to one’s fitness level that is determined by your coach.

You must be in shape to do CrossFit. The goal of CrossFit is to improve health and fitness. We all must start somewhere, and CrossFit is adaptable to all fitness levels and age groups. There are many modifications and scaling options for all exercises that a trained coach will be able to assist you with to reach your goals.

All CrossFit coaches are the same.Although all couches go through the same training, it is only a weekend course and you don’t need an advanced athletic training background to become a coach. It is important to visit a couple of gyms or “boxes” in your area to check out the gym atmosphere and to ask questions to make sure it is a good fit for you as each gym is not the same.

CrossFit will cause injury.  This is probably the biggest misconception about the program.  CrossFit injuries have a reported 3.1 injuries per 1000 hours trained, this is similar to Olympic weightlifting and gymnastics and this number is lower than one who plays contact sports such as rugby, football and soccer. Having a well-trained coach and listening to your body while focusing on form will help in preventing injury.

CrossFit is discouraged by physical therapy community.Many people in the physical therapy world perform CrossFit, and it is recognized in any sport that there is a greater risk of injury, but the complications from not staying active do not out way the benefits of staying active and healthy.

There you have it, five common misconceptions…and the real truth, about CrossFit!

Andrew Vertson

Andrew received his Bachelor’s Degree in Exercise Science from California State University, Fresno in 1991. He then earned his Master’s degree of Physical Therapy in 1996 and his Doctorate degree of Physical Therapy in 2002 from Loma Linda University. In 1996 he also earned his Certification as an Athletic Trainer. He has also completed extensive post-graduate course work in orthopedic manual therapy through Kaiser-West Los Angeles and the Ola Grimsby Institute.
Andrew Vertson

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